OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project)

I recently came across this Blog on AppSec related topics at https://appsecfordevs.com. I found the articles to be very pertinent and helpful to me. Please take a look at this Blog is you are in the Application Security domain.

AppSec For Devs

If you are new to Application Security domain, OWASP has a treasure trove of information on getting you started on path to a great career in application security as a Security Architect, Penetration Tester, Security Assurance Engineer etc. The OWASP Website is located @ https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Main_Page

Some of the main things that I learnt from the OWASP Website are:

  1. Top 10 Web Application Vulnerabilities that are published every 3 years. This list allows you to prioritize your dollars on what defenses you need to build for securing your web application assets. They have recently released the Release Candidate for 2016 OWASP Top 10. The additions to the 2016 list are: a) Automated detection and remediation of vulnerabilities. b) Lack of sufficient security controls in APIs (for e.g. REST APIs). I agree that most organizations that are re-architecting their sites using REST/CSA technologies are missing basic security controls such as authorizations, output escaping…

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OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project)

If you are new to Application Security domain, OWASP has a treasure trove of information on getting you started on path to a great career in application security as a Security Architect, Penetration Tester, Security Assurance Engineer etc. The OWASP Website is located @ https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Main_Page

Some of the main things that I learnt from the OWASP Website are:

  1. Top 10 Web Application Vulnerabilities that are published every 3 years. This list allows you to prioritize your dollars on what defenses you need to build for securing your web application assets. They have recently released the Release Candidate for 2016 OWASP Top 10. The additions to the 2016 list are: a) Automated detection and remediation of vulnerabilities. b) Lack of sufficient security controls in APIs (for e.g. REST APIs). I agree that most organizations that are re-architecting their sites using REST/CSA technologies are missing basic security controls such as authorizations, output escaping etc., making them susceptible to attacks.
  2. Cheatsheets that are provided explain the attack vector, defenses to mitigate the vulnerability and verification of the mitigation are very useful for any application developer. XSS Cheatsheet can be found here. Scroll to the bottom to find cheatsheets for other categories of vulnerabilities.
  3. Open Source tools and libraries such as ZAP Proxy, ESAPI, CSRF Guard, Anti-Samy have been invaluable to me. These tools and libraries have wide exposure and used by security professionals there by providing the assurance that they have been sufficiently vetted for security vulnerabilities. ESAPI has input validation, output escaping and decoding routines that come in handy for any developer.
  4. One of the most recent OWASP projects that I am interested in is OWASP Benchmark that evaluated and published Security Testing Tools for their efficacy, coverage, false positives to false negative ratios allowing you to compare various tools and services that are available in the market place.
  5. I have extensively used OWASP Webgoat for learning when I started on the career path as an Application Security professional. I used the app to evaluate various security testing tools and last but not least teach application security vulnerabilities and mitigations for Development teams.
  6. Last but not least, explore the full range of projects that the OWASP community has made available for helping you secure you web application assets.